SB562: California Single-Payer Health Care (Why 80% of Colorado Voters said “NO”)

stevenstyles wateremarked belator media (28 of 10)

In November 2016, approx 80% of Colorado voters said “no” to Amendment 69–dubbed “Colorado Care”–a plan which would have reverted the state’s health care to a what is known as a singe-payer system.

Employers would have had to pay a new tax of about 7 percent of workers’ wages. Employees would have had a payroll tax of about 3 percent. There would have been no deductibles or co-pays. The funds would have be transferred into a separate authority run by an elected board of directors.
(Source: CBS Denver Article-see link in above paragraph)

According to the plan’s critics, ColoradoCare’s estimated $36 billion budget would have dramatically exceeded state government spending. Interestingly, even fervent well-attended rallies from single-payer advocate Bernie Sanders could not turn public opinion away from their wallets.

Apparently, even heavily-progressive minds are equally protective of their personal health care plans. According to 2014 census information, Colorado has a population of approximately 5.37 million. Utilizing the provided figures, ColoradoCare’s estimated budget breaks down to around $24,000 in costs per person, annually… which–on paper–does have the appearance of being the ‘Maserati of health-care plans’.

SB562–mentioned in an article earlier this year–(set for committee hearing April 26th) is a single-payer health plan, for all Californians, devised by members of the California State Senate.

According to 2016 budget figures, California’s overall medicaid (Medi-Cal) healthcare costs are approximately $41 billion ($19 billion paid from state funds, $22 billion paid from federal) to cover approximately 13.5 million caseloads (people). That breaks down to about $3,057 per person–per year–which is considerably less than ColoradoCare estimated to pay for their citizens… and is even less when one takes into account that 38 million Californians (more than double the current caseload) will be covered if SB562 is made into law. If no further federal or state funds are procured to help cover that increase, then California’s healthcare budget will reduce down to $1,078 per person.

(S) CA Assembly SB1 4-6-2017 (3 of 1)

Even more disconcerting, if the Trump Administration goes through with its implied threat of withdrawing federal funding from sanctuary areas–which includes the entire state of SB54 is enacted by the State Assembly–then the amount of funding available per person in California may be cut in half.

In an off-the-record conversation with a Covered California employee, I brought up SB562; the employee did not even know about the legislation, but when the details were described, he chuckled.

“Oh, that will never go through,” he said with humor. “Californians with high-tier health plans will never allow that to happen.”

Article by L. R. Styles; Photographer: Steven Styles/ Belator Media